Soros' Puppets: Antisemitism and COVID-19 Era

Soros' Puppets: Antisemitism and COVID-19 Era

Thursday, December 17, 2020 at 7:30 PM

The COVID-19 era has witnessed an explosion of bigotries, including conspiratorial antisemitism. From accusations that the virus was made in Israel to claims that the virus is a hoax being used by George Soros and a cabal of elites seeking to enslave non-Jews, baseless and hateful conspiracies are being freely circulated online. Antisemitic conspiracy theories have interacted with other hatreds, including anti-Asian and xenophobic bigotry, blending traditional conspiracies with new anxieties. Why the Jews? (70 min. 2018) and Feels Good Man (92 min. 2020) explore both the historical underpinnings of conspiratorial antisemitism, and how social media and memes have been central to their spread.


On 17 December 2020 Neuberger staff member Daniel Panneton will present and answer questions on the connections between the rise of meme culture and their usage in spreading antisemitism and Holocaust denial, particularly during the COVID-19 era. He will explore how Holocaust imagery has informed both explicit conspiratorial antisemitism and how anti-mask conspiracies have co-opted Holocaust imagery and antisemitic arguments.

Why the Jews? attempts to answer a common question in Holocaust education – why did so many people hate Jews? This documentary interviews academics and public figures such as Shimon Peres, Noam Chomsky, and Dr. Ruth to explore the reasons for both Jewish achievement and anti-Jewish persecution in the past.

Feels Good Man is a documentary about the infamous internet meme Pepe the Frog, and how what began as an innocent web comic evolved into a symbol of the alt-right and antisemites. The documentary follows the creator of Pepe the Frog’s attempts to reclaim control of the character from extremists, and forces audiences to consider whether or not such a symbol could ever be redeemed.

Daniel Panneton is the Acting Manager of Public Programs at the Sarah & Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. He has curated several exhibits, including The Paradox: Free Speech and Holocaust Denial in Canada and The Ward: Representations and Realities, 1890-1940. His work has been published in the Globe & Mail, The Walrus, the Literary Review of Canada, and Spacing.

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The COVID-19 era has witnessed an explosion of bigotries, including conspiratorial antisemitism. From accusations that the virus was made in Israel to claims that the virus is a hoax being used by George Soros and a cabal of elites seeking to enslave non-Jews, baseless and hateful conspiracies are being freely circulated online. Antisemitic conspiracy theories have interacted with other hatreds, including anti-Asian and xenophobic bigotry, blending traditional conspiracies with new anxieties. Why the Jews? (70 min. 2018) and Feels Good Man (92 min. 2020) explore both the historical underpinnings of conspiratorial antisemitism, and how social media and memes have been central to their spread.


On 17 December 2020 Neuberger staff member Daniel Panneton will present and answer questions on the connections between the rise of meme culture and their usage in spreading antisemitism and Holocaust denial, particularly during the COVID-19 era. He will explore how Holocaust imagery has informed both explicit conspiratorial antisemitism and how anti-mask conspiracies have co-opted Holocaust imagery and antisemitic arguments.

Why the Jews? attempts to answer a common question in Holocaust education – why did so many people hate Jews? This documentary interviews academics and public figures such as Shimon Peres, Noam Chomsky, and Dr. Ruth to explore the reasons for both Jewish achievement and anti-Jewish persecution in the past.

Feels Good Man is a documentary about the infamous internet meme Pepe the Frog, and how what began as an innocent web comic evolved into a symbol of the alt-right and antisemites. The documentary follows the creator of Pepe the Frog’s attempts to reclaim control of the character from extremists, and forces audiences to consider whether or not such a symbol could ever be redeemed.

Daniel Panneton is the Acting Manager of Public Programs at the Sarah & Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. He has curated several exhibits, including The Paradox: Free Speech and Holocaust Denial in Canada and The Ward: Representations and Realities, 1890-1940. His work has been published in the Globe & Mail, The Walrus, the Literary Review of Canada, and Spacing.


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